THE
ORG
ANIC
SILK
STO
RY

THE ORGANIC SILK STORY

GOTS (Global Organic Textile Standard)

Hand-woven, organic, eco-friendly… these words are tossed around in the fashion circuit like never before! ‘Organic’ cannot be a mere marketing jargon. It involves steadfast commitment. She is proud to be among the very few designers recognized and certified by GOTS (Global Organic Textile standard), a supreme body in the U.S that lends maximum credibility to a product for being ‘Organic’, after complying with a severe set of stringent rules. The process from end to end is completely ‘Organic’ starting from sourcing, transporting, processing, tagging, stocking and packaging!

“Non-violence is a quality not of the body but of the soul”

Mahatma Gandhi
(He urged people to wear silk without killing the silk worms)

What is Organic Silk?

Organic Silk? -

A SUSTAINABLE AND NON_VIOLENT ALTERNATIVE

The global appeal of our textiles is incredible, and if the finest yarns of silks are obtained in the ‘Organic’ method without killing any living creature, it is simply incredible! This wonder eco-fabric is called Eri or Mulberry silk or the non-violence fabric. It also comes in varieties of Tussar and Ghicha.

“Regular silk” is produced from Cocoons by dropping and killing thousands of silk worms into boiling water before they metamorphose into a moth. The silk is believed to be the finest at this stage. This is done to prevent the Cocoons to open naturally at one end to release moth, whereby the continuity of the fiber is lost.

Organic silk culture is a forest based industry and the yarn is produced in a completely untouched natural environment as the silkworms are reared outdoors on live trees of aasan, arjun & sal an they do not feed on plucked leaves.

“Organic silk” is produced from the cocoon from which the silk moth is naturally released. this exposure to nature result in its truly multi-tonal look, which cannot be duplicated by machine made fabric making it a “truly wild silk”. This piercing of the cocoon results in many pieces of yarn (instead of one continuous thread) which then must be spun together to make a single thread. This process makes it more expensive than “Regular silk”.

These natural silks are made by a collaborative venture of tribal silkworm reares, poor rural women who make yarn and handloom weavers in the hinterlands of India. It provides employment to the disadvantaged groups, living in remote areas and enables self-dependence and better living standards to these unprevileged groups.

TAKING THE VIOLENCE OUT OF SILK